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UE: POL 110-HA: Democracy in Troubled Times

Practical Instruction in Civic Discourse

The Book of Democracy

Democracy: The Unfinished Journey

Democracy: Theory & Practice

Suggestions for Further Research & Expansion

Obviously, a resource site such as this can neither escape evolving with use, nor prevent the effects of electronic loss and decay.  Web resources, particularly video clips, come and go overnight.  Links are moved or abandoned. Content is rewritten and revised.  Copyright issues surface unexpectedly.  It is up to the faculty to keep watch over the site and report all missing links and any dubious information.  It also behooves the faculty to make suggestions for new topics or sub-topics and to recommend new material and Internet resources.  It would be helpful if that material was developed and prepared for inclusion into the website.  Our library is ready to assist you; but we can't expect librarians to do all the heavy lifting.

The Further Research page will serve as our trial page, so that new material may be exhibited, tested, and evaluated in the boxes below. Credit will most certainly be given where credit is due.

The Role of the Military in Democratic Politics

I would be very interested in developing a section of our course on the role of the military in politics.  If someone wants to jump on this, please let me know.

-- Hud Reynolds UC

The Man on Horseback

"The role of the military in a society raises a number of issues: How much separation should there be between a civil government and its army?  Should the military be totally subordinate to the polity?  Or should the armed forces be allowed autonomy in order to provide national security?  In our times, the dangers of military dictatorships -- as have existed in countries like Panama, Chile, and Argentina -- have become clear, but developing countries often lack the administrative ability and societal unity to keep the state functioning in an orderly and economically feasible manner without pronounced militaristic intervention."

History of Revisions to this Website

When this website has been initially completed, this space will provide notification of significant updates.

Website Information

This LibGuide was created by Hudson Reynolds, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. Political Science, University Campus, Saint Leo University. 

Content for several units was suggested by Marco Rimanelli, Ph.D., Prof. Political Science, University Campus, Saint Leo University. 

In the process of arranging this site, help was graciously provided by Doris Van Kampen-Breit, Librarian, University Campus, Saint Leo University.

Copyright 2013.


Fair use notice of copyrighted material:
This site contains some copyrighted material that in certain cases has not been specifically authorized by the copyright owner. We are making such material available in our efforts to advance the understanding of democracy, and social justice issues related to democracy. We believe this constitutes a 'fair use' of any such copyrighted material as provided for in section 107 of the US Copyright Law. In accordance with Title 17 U.S.C. Section 107. The material on this site is distributed without profit for research and educational purposes.

Subject Guide