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HON 499: Spring 2016 Professor Moon's Library Instruction (Dr. Duncan): CG

Books and Ebooks on Hero (Jung, Campbell, and Propp)

Browsing the Catalog (Libraries Worldwide) for Articles about "The Hen Who Dreamed She Could Fly"

The Multi-cultural Narrative Education of ???The Hen Who Dreamed She Could Fly???

Author: A V Myung-Seok Kim
Edition/Format: Article Article : English
Publication: DONAM OHMUNHAK, v27 nnull (201412): 285-309
Database: CrossRef (CG: I think that just the abstract is in English but the paper is in Korean. Ms. Moon)

Lack Triangle Theory and Human Education as Successful Children Content in The Hen Who Dreamed She Could Fly

Author: Hyeong-mo Im
Edition/Format: Article Article : English
Publication: The Journal of Language & Literature, v60 (20141231): 309
Database: CrossRef

EBSCO

Namibian children's and youth literature written in English

Author: Elwyn Jenkins
Edition/Format: Article Article : English
Publication: Mousaion, v32 n4 (2014): 75-92
Database: SA e Publication Journal Collection
Summary:
This article examines 15 works of fiction written in English for children and young adults which have a Namibian setting. The earliest was published in the 1920s and the latest in 1998. The books are examined in order to ascertain what the Namibian setting has contributed: whether the authors have engaged with the history of the country; what they make of the setting; and whether there are any particular plots and themes that emerge. A notable trend in the English-language books published after the 1960s is that they focus on the personal growth of the protagonists. Rather than serving as a background for adventure, as the earlier books did, the Namibian settings and social circumstances serve as catalysts for psychological drama, while the landscapes with their flora and fauna play out as objective correlatives to the characters' interior struggles. In keeping with this subject matter, the writing is usually sensitive and lyrical.  Read less