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UE: HUM 110: Giants of the Arts: Module 2

Giants of the Arts will examine a select group of artists who, through the test of time, have been recognized as true masters; whose works advanced their art form(s), who became a significant influence within their field(s), and who continue to influence

Module 2

Myth and the Arts

Aim of this Module

To provide a foundation for the study of the humanities by looking at some of the mythology which can be found in the creative expressions of all cultures in various time periods.

READ

Chapter 3: Myth and the Origin of the Humanities

PowerPoint

What is Myth?

A myth is “a traditional story of unknown authorship, ostensibly with a historical basis, but serving usually to explain some phenomenon of nature, the origin of humanity, or the customs, religious rites and so on of a people.”

Why Study Myth?


Before there were any formal arts, the humanities took the form of mythology. Early cultures endowed their deeds with significance by reimagining them as drama and visual art, preserved their history by telling stories of their past, and dealt with ethical dilemmas by creating stories that illustrated them. All of the disciplines of the humanities today may well have roots in mythology, and these myths are often universal, shared across cultures. Thus mythology is a good place to start a study of the humanities.

Expert Discussion of Carl Jung

Summary of Carl Jung's Thought

Assessment

RESEARCH ENCOUNTER : HISPANIC HERITAGE CELEBRATION PROPOSAL

(10 points)

DUE IN CLASS

Wednesday, September 14

 

QUIZ 1

The Arts & Humanities, The Infinite Person, “Renaissance Man,” Hero’s Journey

(60 points)

Friday, September 16

 

 

Joseph Campbell and The Hero's Journey

Stages of The Hero’s Journey:

1. Birth: Fabulous circumstances surrounding conception, birth, and childhood establish the hero’s pedigree, and often constitute their own monomyth cycle.

2. Call to Adventure: The hero is called to adventure by some external event or messenger. The Hero may accept the call willingly or reluctantly.

3. Helpers/Amulet: During the early stages of the journey, the hero will often receive aid from a protective figure. This supernatural helper can take a wide variety of forms, such as a wizard, an old man, a crone, or a fairy godmother. The helper commonly gives the hero a protective amulet or weapon for the journey.

4. Crossing the Threshold: Upon reaching the threshold of adventure, the hero must undergo some sort of ordeal in order to pass from the everyday world into the world of adventure. This trial may be as painless as entering a dark cave or as violent as being swallowed up by a whale. The important feature is the contrast between the familiar world of light and the dark, unknown world of adventure.

5. Tests: The hero travels through the dream-like world of adventure where he must undergo a series of tests. These trials are often violent encounters with monsters, sorcerers, warriors, or forces of nature. Each successful test further proves the hero's ability and advances the journey toward its climax.

6. Helpers: The hero is often accompanied on the journey by a helper who assists in the series of tests and generally serves as a loyal companion. Alternately, the hero may encounter a supernatural helper in the world of adventure who fulfills this function.

7. Climax/The Final Battle: This is the critical moment in the hero's journey in which there is often a final battle with a monster, wizard, or warrior which facilitates the particular resolution of the adventure.

8. Flight: After accomplishing the mission, the hero must return to the threshold of adventure and prepare for a return to the everyday world. If the hero has angered the opposing forces by stealing the elixir or killing a powerful monster, the return may take the form of a hasty flight. If the hero has been given the elixir freely, the flight may be a benign stage of the journey.

9. Return: The hero again crosses the threshold of adventure and returns to the everyday world of daylight. The return usually takes the form of an awakening, rebirth, resurrection, or a simple emergence from a cave or forest. Sometimes the hero is pulled out of the adventure world by a force from the daylight world.

10. Elixer: The object, knowledge, or blessing that the hero acquired during the adventure is now put to use in the everyday world. Often it has a restorative or healing function, but it also serves to define the hero's role in the society.

11. Home: The hero comes back from this mysterious adventure with the power to bestow boons on his fellow man.

Introduction to Joseph Campbell's Thought

The Hero's Journey in Action