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Presidential Campaigns in U.S. History: Henry Clay

Henry Clay:

The Contendors, a C-Span series. People who lost the Presidential election, but changed history.

C-SPAN: The Contenders: Henry Clay

  • 4/12/1777-6/29/1852
  • Henry Clay was chosen Speaker of the House on the first day of his first session in Congress, something never done before or since.
  • Ran for president five times
  • "I had rather be right than be President."

You can find  a short biography of Henry Clay in the Biographical Directory of the Unites State Congress, 1774-present

Youtube Overview of Henry Clay

The Campaigns

The Contenders: Henry Clay. Online Video about Henry Clay, and his campaigns to be president of the United States.

According to About.com, "The election of 1824 involved three major figures in American history, and was decided in the House of Representatives. One man won, one helped him win, and one stormed out of Washington denouncing the entire affair as “the corrupt bargain.” Until the disputed election of 2000, the dubious election of 1824 was the most controversial election in American history."

"The election of 1828 was significant as it heralded a profound change with the election of a man widely viewed as a champion of the common people. But that year's campaigning was also noteworthy for the intense personal attacks widely employed by the supporters of both candidates."

 

The Junto Society has a nice summary of Henry Clay's campaign's.

EBooks available through the Library

His opponents

The election of 1828 was significant as it heralded a profound change with the election of a man widely viewed as a champion of the common people. But that year's campaigning was also noteworthy for the intense personal attacks widely employed by the supporters of both candidates.

The 1828 Campiagn: Andrew Jackson and the growth of party politics