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MGT 312: Introduction to Project Management: Qualitative and Quantitative

Introduction to Project Management

Definitions

"Qualitative Research is a form of enquiry employed in many different academic disciplines, traditionally in the social sciences and marketing research. The qualitative researchers' aim is to get an in-depth understanding of human behaviors and the reasons that govern such behaviors through the use of a variety of approaches. The qualitative method therefore investigates the why and how of behaviors, not merely the what, where and when. Hence, smaller but focused samples are more often used rather than larger ones....Qualitative research is a widely used approach to observation in academic disciplines, including the social and behavioral sciences, and in market research to inform business and policy decisions. The major aim of a qualitative approach is to gather information that captures social life as experienced by participants. Qualitative techniques (e.g., unstructured data collected from interviews, open-ended survey responses, field notes, feedback forms, photos and videos) are used to evaluate human behavior and develop theoretical explanations of such behavior. Typically, behaviors are studied within the context in which they occur and where the role of the researcher would not affect the normal behavior of the research participants. The method therefore investigates the why and how of behaviors, not merely the what, when, and where. Because of this in-depth inquiry, researchers often focus on smaller, purposefully selected samples rather than larger randomly selected samples, thereby producing information pertaining only to those cases observed. No general conclusions can therefore be drawn for the wider population; only informed assertions can be made." Read the full definition at the following link

Morris, S. V., Rockett, J., & Elechi, O. O. (2014). Qualitative research. In J. S. Albanese, The encyclopedia of criminology and criminal justice. Wiley. Credo Reference

 

"Quantitative research involves the assignment of numbers to social concepts and then using these numbers to measure those concepts. Quantitative research is based in “positivism”—an approach to research with roots in the natural/physical sciences. The distinction between quantitative and qualitative research really boils down to the use of numerical versus non-numerical data.... Quantitative research involves the assignment of numbers to social concepts and then using these numbers to measure those concepts. Quantitative research is based in “positivism”—an approach to research with roots in the natural/physical sciences. Indeed, the distinction between quantitative and qualitative research really boils down to the use of numerical versus non-numerical data. Quantitative research is most often used in cases where the researcher has specific research questions in mind (based on a priori theory or in an attempt to answer a practical problem) and is able to have access to (or create) good measures of the phenomenon that is to be measured. A classic example of this is the investigation of the relationship between achievement and intelligence. There is good theoretical reason to suggest a relationship between these variables. Moreover, reliable, valid, and well-used measures of both concepts are widely available." Read the full definition at the following link

Shelley, G. P. (2014). Quantitative research. In J. S. Albanese, The encyclopedia of criminology and criminal justice. Wiley. Credo Reference

Qualitative

Quantitative